By Veronika Kyrylenko
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Parents of students in the wealthy Loudoun County, Virginia, Public School District (LCPS) torched the local school board over the assignment of sexually explicit, vulgar books to their high-school freshmen children.

On Tuesday, during the heated Loudoun County School Board meeting, a group of parents took to the stage to read excerpts from Tiffany D. Jackson’s book Monday’s Not Coming. The title’s contents are posted as part of the LCPS’ “Diverse text collection” for ninth grade and depict scenes of graphic underage sex and violent domestic abuse.

At the meeting, one of the parents read this explicit excerpt:

I came home early from babysitting and see her coming out of some car, in these tight-a** little shorts, talking fast, telling me she’s about to leave me. I grabbed her by the neck and started punching her. She wanted to be all big and bad, trying to face me like a grown-a** woman, she gonna get beat like a grown woman. She started screaming, cursing at me and carrying on. I threw her in the closet for a couple of days. She kept on screaming, begging to be let out, begging for water. Every time she made too much noise I’d walk in and kick her.

The Daily Wire obtained a copy of an Honors English class presentation on Monday’s Not Coming, which highlighted passages of text alluding to potential sexual assault and oral sex.

“Me and Monday…. We did do something.” He took a deep breath. “She… sucked my d***. I didn’t really want it to happen, it just kinda… did,” the presentation reads. “Her top lip curled up. ‘Wait a minute, is that what was really going on? She did your homework and you [ate] her c****ie! Is that why you crying? ‘Cause Monday’s not around to do your homework no more?’”

“Does anyone want to talk about that stuff [explicit topics in the book] now?” asked U.S. Army veteran and conservative radio talk-show host Joe Mobley, who also participated in the meeting. Crickets chirped, as Mobley went on to note how uncomfortable and unacceptable were the topics of the book. He stated that the school board violated many of its own policies, spending $1.8 million on “trash books” that were presumably not properly reviewed, going against LCPS’ official code of conduct.

Reportedly, the concerned parent organization Parents Against Critical Theory sent an e-mail to the administration asking why educators are advocating for books promoting “promiscuous actions.” The e-mail listed a slew of inappropriate passages from the book, including some 30-plus phrases that included the word “f**k.”

As reported by Fox News, one LCPS parent, who wished to remain anonymous, said parents were not told of the curriculum change to include books initially left off the class curriculum.

“When the original syllabus was given to the parents of the honors English class in August, these books were not part of the list,” the parent said. “They added them without informing the principal or the parents.”

“From what I understand, and I was not in the room, the children were told they did not have to share the changes with their family,” the parent continued, adding that LCPS Stone Bridge High School principal was “appalled and horrified when he found this out from the parents.” The parent remarked that the principal provided students with “alternate reading assignments” in class.

Monday’s Not Coming has received starred reviews from both Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal, which named it a Best Book of 2018.

In 2019, LCPS came under fire for similar concerns from parents who discovered age-inappropriate books were placed in classrooms across the school district as part of a new Diverse Classroom Library Initiative.

While most of these titles focus on introducing kids to different cultures and ethnicities, parents began to notice that an alarming number of the works concentrated on “sexual diversity” and contained sexually explicit language, including “frequent descriptions of underage drinking, fondling, masturbation, orgasms, oral sex, sexual intercourse, sexual abuse, statutory rape, incest, and rape.”

Even books at the kindergarten level promote LGBTQ ideology through titles such as Cheryl Kilodavis’s My Princess Boy, designed to introduce five- and six-year-olds to the idea that they can change their gender, and Lesléa Newman’s Heather Has Two Mommies, which denies the need for fathers in the family and ignores the loss a child might feel over having no relationship with his or her father.

Other titles in the classroom include Prince and Knight (second grade), Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak OutSome Girls BindWeird Girl, and What’s His Name (positively featuring statutory rape between a young boy and his boss, and a relationship between a girl and her teacher), and Being Jazz: My Life as a Transgender Teen.

Many of these books are still listed as part of the school curriculum.

The dangers of early sexual initiation have long been studied and may be summarized as “The sooner, the worse.” Promoting graphic sexual content that incites harmful behavior at such a young age is irresponsible at best. It remains unclear the educational value these books possess other than to corrupt a child’s innocence early.

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