By Calvin Freiburger
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In a striking reversal from the Big Tech consensus about the 2020 election, retail giant Amazon is taking the position that voting by mail should not be allowed when it comes to its own employees’ decision whether to unionize.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Amazon is objecting to the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB’s) decision to permit mail-in ballots instead of making workers vote in-person due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Claiming the NLRB had not adequately defined an “outbreak” necessitating mail ballots, Amazon insists it has established a “safe, confidential and convenient proposal for associates to vote on-site” in the election, which concerns 6,000 workers at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama, and that its proposal “is in the best interest of all parties — associate convenience, vote fidelity and timeliness of vote count.”

Amazon’s stance when mail voting affects its own affairs is noteworthy in light of the 2020 elections’ dramatically expanded use of mail-in ballots, which several states allowed without voters having to show a specific need, based on the theory that voting in person was too dangerous thanks to the potential of spreading COVID-19 (fears that were not realized after the spring primary elections). This change alone has generated significant doubt about the legitimacy of the presidential election, due to mail ballots’ greater potential for fraud.

During the presidential campaign, Amazon treated mail voting as legitimate by partnering with TurboVote to help voters “with voter registration and voting by mail,” citing state efforts to “safeguard” elections in the wake of COVID-19. This month, Amazon Web Services blacklisted Twitter competitor Parler for allowing posts “inciting violence,” which in prevailing left-wing parlance includes any continued questioning of the election results.

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